Map of Simcoe Muskoka

Infectious Diseases

Cyclosporiasis

Cyclosporiasis is a disease caused by the protozoa Cyclospora cayetanensis. Some people with cyclosporiasis do not have any symptoms. Symptoms include watery diarrhea, nausea, loss of appetite, fatigue, abdominal cramps and weight loss. Cyclosporiasis is spread by consuming contaminated food or water or swimming in contaminated water. This disease is most common in tropical or subtropical countries. Outbreaks in Canada have been associated with contaminated fruits, vegetables and fresh herbs imported from tropical countries. For more information, see the health unit’s fact sheet on cyclospora.

Simcoe Muskoka

Ontario

Technical Notes

Simcoe Muskoka

The following graph shows the number of cyclosporiasis cases in Simcoe Muskoka between 2002 and 2016. The number of cyclosporiasis cases in Simcoe Muskoka varies between zero and nine cases per year.  There was a local outbreak in 2009 that accounts for 10 of the 17 cases in that year. In 2016, six cases of cyclosporiasis were reported in Simcoe Muskoka.

2014Cyclo_counts

Ontario

The following graph shows the incidence rate of cyclosporiasis in Simcoe Muskoka and Ontario between 2002 and 2016. The incidence rate in Simcoe Muskoka is comparable to the Ontario rate, however it is more variable than the Ontario rate because it is based on smaller numbers. In 2016, the Simcoe Muskoka incident rate was 1.1 cases per 100,000 while the Ontario rate was 2.0 cases per 100,000 population.

2014Cyclo_rartes

Technical Notes

There are many factors that influence how many cases are reported to the health unit, as explained on the Infectious Diseases page.

Cyclosporiasis became reportable in the province of Ontario in 2001. 

Provincial definitions classify cases as confirmed or probable based on clinical and/or laboratory diagnostic criteria.  The provincial case definition for cyclosporiasis changed in April 2009 to include a definition for probable cases whereas before there was no such classification.  The definitions of confirmed and probable cases from 2009 onwards are comparable to confirmed cases before 2009.