Map of Simcoe Muskoka

Infectious Diseases

Campylobacter Enteritis

Campylobacter enteritis is a disease caused by bacteria belonging to the family Campylobacter. Symptoms of Campylobacter enteritis include diarrhea (sometimes bloody), nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain and fever. It is spread by consuming contaminated food or water, or through contact with an infected animal or person. For more information, see the health unit's fact sheet on Campylobacter

Simcoe Muskoka

Ontario

Technical Notes

Simcoe Muskoka

The following graph shows the number of Campylobacter enteritis cases in Simcoe Muskoka between 2000 and 2015. In the past ten years, there have been between 80 and 132 cases of Campylobacter enteritis every year.  An investigation into the 2007 cases found an increase in the proportion of travel-acquired campylobacter enteritis cases compared to previous years. In 2015, 117 cases of campylobacter enteritis were reported to the health unit.

2014Campy_counts

Ontario

The following graph shows the incidence rate of Campylobacter enteritis in Simcoe Muskoka and Ontario between 2000 and 2015.  The incidence rate in Simcoe Muskoka is lower than the Ontario rate, but the difference between the rates has become smaller over the last four years. Both of these rates experienced an overall decrease since 2000.  In 2015, the incidence rate for Simcoe Muskoka was 21.3 cases per 100,000 population and the incidence rate for Ontario was 24.0 cases per 100,000 population.

2014Campy_rate

More detailed data for Ontario and each health unit can be found on Public Health Ontario’s interactiveSnapshots tool, by clicking on “Select Indicator”. 

Technical Notes

There are many factors that influence how many cases are reported to the health unit, as explained on the Infectious Diseases page.

Provincial definitions classify cases as confirmed or probable based on clinical and/or laboratory diagnostic criteria.  The provincial case definition for campylobacter enteritis changed in April 2009 to include a definition for probable cases whereas before there was no such classification.  The definitions of confirmed and probable cases from 2009 onwards are comparable to confirmed cases before 2009.